Thu June 13, 2024

1.	Kathy Paczynski, Recreation Supervisor of the Prairie Grass Nature Museum and Huebner Fishery Management Foundation, stands in Fairfield Park
Kathy Paczynski, Recreation Supervisor of the Prairie
Grass Nature Museum and Huebner Fishery Management
Foundation, stands in Fairfield Park. This grant will support
removal of invasive woody species and hazardous trees in the park.

Round Lake Area Park District awarded grant to boost urban tree canopy

 Round Lake, Ill. June 13, 2024 — The Round Lake Area Park District has been awarded a $50,000 subgrant by The Morton Arboretum’s Chicago Region Trees Initiative (CRTI) to improve its community tree canopy.
The competitive subgrant is among 17 provided to government entities through Inflation Reduction Act funding to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, administered by CRTI.
The four-year grants, which do not require matching funds, are available for communities that meet the federal requirements as disadvantaged. The funding can be used for projects that increase tree canopy, improve forest health, and create or enhance community forestry programs.
“We’re excited by the opportunity to improve the health of the woodlands at Fairfield Park,” said Kathy Paczynski, Recreation Supervisor of the Prairie Grass Nature Museum and Huebner Fishery Management Foundation. “We want to thank the community organizations that helped us apply for this grant, including Together for Nature/Juntos para la Naturaleza; Monarchs, Milkweed and More; Manitou Creek Watershed  Alliance; Long Lake Improvement and Sanitation Association; and the Illinois Beaver Alliance.”
Through this subgrant, the Park District will be able to remove invasive woody species and hazardous trees in 14.3 acres of Fairfield Park, and complete outreach, volunteer and educational work by Feb 1, 2028.
All grant-funded projects must also complete the development or enhancement of a tree protection ordinance or policy that sets standards of care for newly planted trees and helps to ensure the tree canopy is maintained and protected long after the grant ends.
“Improving the distribution of trees and green spaces directly impacts the health and economic outcomes for communities,” said CRTI Director Zach Wirtz. “Projects like this improve quality of life and boost the urban tree canopy’s resilience to threats posed by climate change, pests and diseases.”
Funding support for this project was provided by the Inflation Reduction Act through the Urban and Community Forestry Programs of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the USDA Forest Service Eastern Region. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

2.	From left: Jill Koski, Morton Arboretum president and CEO; Mary Handelsman from Manitou Creek Drainage District; Gloria Charland with Together for Nature/Juntos para la Naturaleza; and Dr. Homer Wilkes, Undersecretary for Natural Resources and Environment, USDA, at the announcement of the grant awards.   
From left: Jill Koski, Morton Arboretum president and CEO;
Mary Handelsman from Manitou Creek Drainage District;
Gloria Charland with Together for Nature/Juntos para la Naturaleza;
and Dr. Homer Wilkes, Undersecretary for Natural Resources
and Environment, USDA, at the announcement of the grant awards.